Deep Conversations on Tinder: The Latest Art Installation in Bushwick

January 7, 2015 Comments Off on Deep Conversations on Tinder: The Latest Art Installation in Bushwick 966 Art, Relationships, Sexuality
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Because OKCupid is now the equivalent of eHarmony in terms of being for olds, Tinder has sustained its place as the new Blendr (Grindr for straight people). Being that having meaningful conversations with sexual prospects in real life is next to impossible (and usually doesn’t sound even half as¬†profound when compared to viewing sentences in printed format), more Bushwickians have made strides toward poignancy with their “deep” exchanges on Tinder.

A sampling of deepness

A sampling of deepness

Many Bushwickians who have had their fair share of heartache (accompanied by laughs over some of the written come-ons they’ve seen) as a result of engaging the Tinder set in the hope of something more than just a quick fling have decided to come together for one grand purpose: to compile all of the horrible/hilarious/unintelligible things that have been said to them and transform it into one massive multimedia art installation (location TBD).

There will be a section of the show called "The Literary Set"

There will be a section of the show called “The Literary Set”

The lead orchestrator of the installation, Samantha Lovelorn, a 29-year-old who feels she’s already well past an acceptable age for using the beloved app, told The Burning Bush, “I feel that Tinder has become such a meta experience in Bushwick that it’s long overdue for an art homage. The unintentional depth of some of the lines people send you must be preserved and revered–that’s what Deep Conversations on Tinder seeks to achieve.” Ultimately, Lovelorn wishes to see the exhibit go on to all other major cities once it has been overexposed in Bushwick (incidentally, this is also the title of another exhibit currently taking place at The Living Gallery, centered not on nudity–as one might suspect–but on how being famous in Bushwick can take its toll; see: Penn Badgley, Zosia Mamet).

Written by Genna Rivieccio

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