Maria Hernandez Park Film Series Gains More Cachet After SummerScreen at McCarren Starts Checking Bags for “Beverages”

July 12, 2017 Comments Off on Maria Hernandez Park Film Series Gains More Cachet After SummerScreen at McCarren Starts Checking Bags for “Beverages” 183 Film
Share!

When considering the, of late, appalling nature of the film lineup at SummerScreen (the constant catering to millennial neuroses evident in selections from last year’s presence of 10 Things I Hate About You and I Know What You Did Last Summer), the series that has cropped up at Maria Hernandez Park already has the original North Brooklyn answer to free cinema beat. And it isn’t just the recent screening of Selena there (which, by the way SummerScreen is blatantly ripping off by showing it on July 26th) that has melted the hearts of Bushwickians.

The whole allure of going to a free movie is–was–bringing alcohol

No, what’s brought Bushwick nexus even closer to its own film series, SunScreen, which so often favors, shall we say, edgier picks. What finally cemented the preference for staying local and as far away from Williamsburg as possible was the sudden threat of checking people’s bags for alcohol not only upon entering the “venue,” but also at random–like rehab spot checks for alcoholics.

People are going to start needing to get more innovative with how they hide their alcohol

“It’s complete bullshit and just another testament to how few liberties we as Americans–as Brooklynites–have left. And they’re also fucking nuts if they think random spot checks are going to prevent me from bringing my sunscreen lotion flask into the venue and getting turnt while I barely watch the fucking same movie I’ve already seen a million times when I was like sixteen,” seethed Rebecca Rebuttal, a 28-year-old who has seen every Mark Waters movie. But not everyone will have the same fortitude and will to conceal their taste just for the sake of “amenity-rich” viewings in Williamsburg. For there is no amenity richer than the ability to easily drink in public.

Written by Genna Rivieccio

 

Comments are closed.